Insurance for Mountaineering – read the fine print!

grey Insurance for Mountaineering   read the fine print! grey Insurance for Mountaineering   read the fine print! grey Insurance for Mountaineering   read the fine print!
grey Insurance for Mountaineering   read the fine print! grey Insurance for Mountaineering   read the fine print!
grey Insurance for Mountaineering   read the fine print!

 

I’ll begin this story with a happy ending…I think I may have found a way to get mountaineering insurance coverage for my upcoming climb in Nepal.

In short, the only way I could arrange this is to get regular, everyday medical and travel insurance, then to fork out a sizeable sum to a second company that covers medical evacuation only. This is because every company I spoke with, and there were heaps, have exclusions on insurance for “mountaineering using specialist equipment.”

At first I thought I could do what I did last time and insure with BUPA, one package. But things have changed since 2011 when we climbed Manaslu. See the (somewhat farcical) conversation I had online with a rep below:

Please wait for a Customer Consultant to respond.

You are now chatting with ‘Jeanette Jacobsen’

Jeanette Jacobsen: Welcome to ihi Bupa live chat. How may I help you?

Ben: Hi there, I am mountaineering in Nepal this October-Nov. Do you cover this sport?

Jeanette Jacobsen: one moment please

Ben: No worries

Please wait while I transfer the chat to ‘Johanna C. Kreiss’.

You are now chatting with ‘Johanna C. Kreiss’

Johanna C. Kreiss: Regarding mountaineering, we need some questions to be answered from you regarding your trip and coverage.

Ben: Okay, are these questions in the application form when I go to sign up?

Johanna C. Kreiss: we need you to send us an e-mail with the following to travel@ihi.com:

  1. A travel description of the expedition you are going on; for example route, whether you will be trekking or climbing from e.g. south, north etc.
  2. The mountains you will be trekking or climbing as well as the exact altitude.
  3. The kind of equipment you will be using, oxygen, crampons, ropes, harness etc.
  4. If you will be using a guide/sherpa and/or porter?
  5. If you are planning to stay over night during the mountaineering expedition?

Ben: No worries, shall do

Johanna C. Kreiss: Yes, and we need to look further into your trip. please be aware that we do not cover mountaineering that requires specialised climbing equipment

Ben: What is specialised? As in carabiners, ropes, ice axes

Johanna C. Kreiss: yes, exactly

Ben: Okay, that’s me out then, thanks for your time!

Johanna C. Kreiss: You are welcome sir

The Oxford dictionary defines mountaineering as “the sport of climbing mountains.” When saying  they “cover mountaineering” they are technically correct…but, by that rational, you could technically walk up the nearest hill and call it mountaineering expedition. Saying that you cover mountaineering, but not with ixe aces, crampons, ropes etc is like saying a Facebook status update is computer programming, or riding a bike to the French patissere down the corner is Tour de France training.

So, reading around a few helpful blogs  I discovered that many climbers split insurance and have one for travel/medical and one for medical evacuation. Two main options here:

Global rescue:

Looking around I found a guy on the Lonely Planet forum who described a trek to Everesst Base camp. He developed HAPE, and very wisely, his guide got him on a helicopter and straight to a hospital in Kathmandu. When he contacted the company (within 24hours like they want, still a very sick man) he was told that in the product disclaimer it says he needed to contact them first. As Yaks were available (yet completely unrealistic given his condition) they said he will not be covered. The Nepalese embassy took his passport, effectively locking him into the country until his bill was settled…this is only one mans experience and I don’t want to base my decision on this alone but, it does not look promising.

Many helicopter companies do not send out hep until they have insurance details and I don’t fancy being stuck on a mountain trying to argue with a company via Sat phone about if I need a chopper or not, I would want to just get out!

On top of this Global rescue are expensive. Due to the length of the trip I would require to sign up for a year-long membership which would set me back a cool $655. Compared to the thousands of dollars a helicopter trip would cost, and considering they would likely not send one to an uninsured climber, this may be my best bet…

GEOS – leading provider: 

Currently for the evacuation insurance these guys are my leading option. I just need to confirm a little detail in their exclusions. See my enquiry below:

Hi there,
I am leaving for Nepal in 2 weeks for a climbing trip to Ama Dablam (6856 mtrs). Have medical and travel insurance but need Medical evac. Wondering if I would be covered as a client on a mountaineering expedition as I found this in the exclusions:

any Member taking part in or training for:
(a) expeditions, time trials and/or record attempts where an expedition is defined as “an organized journey or voyage for a
specific purpose: especially but not exclusively for exploration or for a scientific or military purpose and organized by a third party or an organized journey requiring a permit”.

Specifically wondering about the “organized by a third party or an organised journey requiring a permit” part…

I will update this post when I get a response and let you know the outcome of all this research.

The main takeaway message from this post is to READ THE FINE PRINT. I would hate any of you guys to be stuck in a bad financial or life threatening situation because the insurance product you bought is not what you thought it was.

Blue skies and happy feet,

Ben

UPDATE 23rd September –  GEO never replied to my enquiry,  have booked medical evac with Global resuce, individual cover was not too bad price-wise without the security update (trust a war will not break out in the Khumbu). https://www.globalrescue.com

Note: information in this post was accurate at the time of writing. This is intended as a personal memoir of my experiences and in not meant to replace your own research and information. All decisions relating to insurance are yours, and yours alone.

2 Responses to Insurance for Mountaineering – read the fine print!

  • Adam Broadhurst says:

    i’m tipping if something happens they’ll say:
    - you were on an organised journey with the specific purpose of reaching the summit of a mountain

    Guess you need a permit as well so they’ll screw you there
    and anything at all can be classified as organised.

    If I organise an expedition to a national park with someone, with the specific purpose of seeing a eucalyptus tree and a koala falls on my head and knocks me out, I think the wording would allow them to knock back an evac.

    Look forward to seeing what they say.

    • Ben says:

      Yeah, that’s my thoughts as well Adam! But when/if they get back to me I’ll update this post…it’s looking like the Global rescue option and having to ask permission if I need to take a helo flight :-/

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