Rock climbing in Huaraz, Peru

grey Rock climbing in Huaraz, Peru

I have been in recent email contact with Chris who is going to help with the logistics of my Huayhush trek. Along with owning the locally famous Cafe Andino Chris runs a trekking company. He is also putting my in touch with someone to take me rock climbing in Huaraz, Peru.

We discuss details and pour over a map while drinking fantastic coffee. Chris tells me that there have been some issues with trekkers being robbed on the trail,

“In 1994 one person died from blood loss after being shot for resisting banditos and rumours abound that bandits are currently active in the area.”

“Really, Gosh, in Australia the hills are safe.”

“Not so here Ben”

“I had a scare last night…”

Before my coffee is gone I am persuaded to hire a local helper to handle the donkeys and find safe camping spots.

I am slightly disappointed that my long held dream of wandering off into the sunset alone with a donkey now has a ‘plus one’ but am sure I have made the right choice. We organise logistics and set a date to leave on Saturday. I now have two days in Huaraz to fill before leaving.

Huaraz is a haven for outdoor adventuring types, every street is bristling with long European legs in trekking pants and locals selling second hand boots displayed on rugs. I spend the afternoon wandering the markets while wondering if locals find these very cheap boots high on glaciers, shake out lost toes and dry them to sell, or, if they are left behind by grateful clients. Filling two days in Huaraz will not be a problem, I go into a highly recommended climbing centre, “Ice or rock climbing sir? Would you like mountain biking or rafting with that?”

grey Rock climbing in Huaraz, PeruThe next morning I am hanging from a small ledge about ten meters up a cliff just outside Huaraz. Rosweldt my tiny but enthusiastic belay is yelling at me

“Arriba! Arriba!…Up! Up!”

I have machine gun legs, arms shaking from fatigue and am grinning like a cat in an aviary. I have only tried rock climbing a few times and have never fallen, never had to trust that rope and belay. One minute later this changes as I lunge for a hold, miss and fall.

My stomach clenches and I let out a small yip of fear falling about three metres. Rosweldt’s weight stalls my drop but he is lifted about one meter into the air by the jerk. When rock climbing you thread rope through an anchor at the top. One end is attached to the climber, the other to the belay, this is called top roping. The belay takes in or lets out slack as the climber goes up or down. When (not if) the climber falls, it is the belay’s job to lock the rope at his end and to use his weight to stop the climber from going splat.

grey Rock climbing in Huaraz, PeruTrust is essential in this game.

Due to a weight discrepancy my belay is suddenly propelled up a little way by his waist harness. Rosweldt is stuck about one meter off the ground, his legs kick hopelessly for a hold while he holds the rope locked. I am stuck considerably further up gripping nothing but a grim trust in my guide. Rosweldt slowly lets out rope and we both descend. Once his feet meet the ground Rosweldt tightens the rope and I climb again. With the benefit of adrenaline this time I bolt to the top. Despite my shaking state I am very glad to have had the experience of falling, my climbing significantly improves afterwards without the worry of “What if I fall?”.

Trusting the rope and my belay to stall the sudden shock of eighty kilograms of hairy Tasmanian I climb much harder routes than I have ever done before. I even manage to climb a little overhung section. Something I never thought I would achieve.

grey Rock climbing in Huaraz, PeruRaising a steaming mug of hot chocolate with bleeding, shaky hands I discuss the final details of my Huayhush Circuit mission with Chris. Because of my excitement it took me until 3am to sleep last night. Despite this being the rainy season describing my mood as excited would be a disgraceful understatement. The rainy season will only add to the adventure because I will have the trail to myself for the small price of wet boots.

I am especially looking forward to camping next to the lake at the base of Siula Grande. Siula Grande is a 6344 meter high mountain made famous by Joe Simpson and Simon Yates‘ climb in 1985. On the descent after a successful summit Joe slipped and fell down an ice face, on impact his leg exploded like a Christmas bonbon. Joe and Simon continued to descend the mountain until they reached a section that required Simon to lower Joe over a cliff of unknown height. Soon a knot which joined their two ropes prevented Joe from descending further. Due to badly frostbitten fingers Joe dropped a device which would have allowed him to ascend safely again. Simon held onto his friend in a whiteout for a long time not knowing what had happened. When it was clear that Simon’s stance was about to collapse he made the agonising decision to cut the rope and send his friend to certain death before descending alone with a heavy conscience. Joe fell into a deep crevasse which opened onto a glacier, he crawled back to base over many days.

grey Rock climbing in Huaraz, PeruThe drama was documented in Joe Simpson’s well known book ‘Touching the Void’ A movie of the same name was released in 2003 and won many awards, I look forward to seeing the stage where this story unfolded.

I will be happy to view the mountain from the base and can safely rule out an attempt on the summit.

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This business partnership has expired.” Ben has no idea what adventures are in store when he sets out to discover what lies over that next mountain.

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